Pastoral Care
 

The ability to make every child feel they truly belong and that they are part of a cherished community is one of King’s greatest strengths.

The power of the King’s community flows from a number of elements. The most immediately apparent is the uplifting presence of the Cathedral, which, for everyone at King’s, provides a marvellous sense of continuity with past generations of scholars and tutors that is profoundly reassuring and inspiring.

Our renowned pastoral system plays an active part in every aspect of school life. Each pupil has a personal tutor with whom they have daily contact and regular one-to-one meetings to review progress and talk through any difficulties.

Tutors are a natural first contact for pupils and work in close partnership with parents to resolve any concerns. Tutors are supported by the Head of Year who is in turn guided by the Deputy Head (Pastoral) ­– who oversees the entire pastoral system.                     

Other sources of help include the School Welfare Officer, who is always on-hand to advise on health or well-being issues; along with the School GP and our trained Well-Being Mentor, who are always available should the need arise. Pupils can also talk to one of our Peer Mentors – a specially trained Sixth Former who has the advantage of being closer in age to the young person seeking support. 

A constantly evolving PSHE programme supports our pastoral care. Delivered by specialist teachers and reinforced by tutors, pupils are engaged in lively debate around issues facing young people today.

Community cohesion is also greatly assisted by our thriving House System, which enables pupils to get to know each other across the school. Laud, Serlo and Wheeler Houses contend throughout the year in events including drama, music, sport and debating, as well as striving to win the end of term Academic Cup. Competition is fierce, but fair and friendly, with pupils developing a real passion for their House.

The pupils themselves provide an equally valuable element of community support. The nature of our school population and small class sizes enable strong and lasting friendships to form rapidly. These give tremendous assistance as pupils move through the school and, inevitably, direct their focus towards exams.

Early intervention and signposting are essential to the effectiveness of supporting a pupil who is experiencing difficulties. The School has developed good links with outside agencies, and referrals can be made should more in depth support be necessary.

The ultimate aim of a strong community is to help its members flourish, and we are proud that King’s inclusive and nurturing environment does exactly that.